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Highway funding plans passed in recent years by US states

Highway funding plans passed in recent years by US states

McClatchyDC.com
MAY 06, 2017 2:05 PM
The Associated Press

About two-thirds of the states have enacted transportation funding measures within the past five years. Here's a look at what those states have done.

ALASKA

2012: Voters approve nearly $454 million in bonds for transportation projects, including about $250 million for roads and $195 million for grants to local ports, harbors and rail projects.

ARKANSAS

2012: Voters approve a one-half cent sales tax increase for 10 years to cover $1.3 billion in bonds for highways. The tax and bonds are part of a total $1.8 billion highway program that also dedicates an existing 1 cent-per-gallon fuel tax to roads.

2016: Republican Gov. Asa Hutchison signs a law redirecting $50 million from surplus, investments and other funds to highways. A study released later that year estimates Arkansas has $750 million of needed repairs to roads and bridges.

CALIFORNIA

2017: Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown signs a law projected to raise $52.4 billion over 10 years for roads, bridges, public transit and biking and walking trails. Gasoline taxes will rise by 12 cents per gallon in November and by 19.5 cents by 2020. Diesel taxes will rise by a total of 20 cents per gallon, and diesel sales taxes by 4 percent.

The law also includes new vehicle fees. Both the taxes and fees will rise annually with inflation. The plan aims to address part of a $137 billion backlog of deferred maintenance on state and local roads. It also repays $706 million diverted from transportation funds to general purposes in previous years.

CONNECTICUT

2015: Democratic Gov. Dannel Malloy signs a law authorizing $2.8 billion in bonds to be combined with existing money under a $10 billion, five-year transportation plan. The bonds are to be repaid partly by diverting one-half cent of Connecticut's existing general sales tax to a transportation fund. Malloy promoted the law as a first step in a 30-year, $100 billion transportation initiative, but there is no funding in place yet for that longer-term plan... FULL ARTICLE

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